“Pravda víťazí” – Slovak Version

November 18, 2017

Allan Stevo

“Pravda víťazí” – Tublatanka playing the Slovak version of “Pravda víťazí.”

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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“Pravda víťazí” – English Version

November 18, 2017

Allan Stevo

“Pravda víťazí” – Tublatanka playing the English version of “Pravda víťazí.” The original is better, but this video does a good job of making the band, and its anthem of the times, available to foreign audiences.

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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How To Celebrate The Velvet Revolution

Velvet Revolution

November 17, 2017

Allan Stevo

November 17 is widely considered the anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, when Czechoslovakia’s Communist Government fell.  Determining such dates is not very cut and dry and on November 17, 1989 virtually no one in Czechoslovakia realized the significance of what was happening  – at least that’s what I have gathered from the many accounts I have pieced together.

For the last ten years I have written something on the anniversary of the Velvet Revolution and most years I’ve sat in front of a TV with my friend Olga for a few hours watching reruns of what played on Czechoslovak television in the fall and winter of 1989.

Anyone who knows a Slovak or Czech speaker who lived through that time and has access to the television footage from the Velvet Revolution is missing a perfect opportunity to learn a great deal about Slovak culture.  Buy a few beers, cook a pot of gulas, and invite your Slovak or Czech friend over to watch the old footage with you.

Click here to keep reading How To Celebrate The Velvet Revolution

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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This Is The Day Of The Bloodless

The Bloodless

November 16, 2017

Allan Stevo

Yugoslavia split in a great war.  Czechoslovakia changed largely peacefully in a “Gentle Revolution” as the Slovaks call it, or “Velvet Revolution” as the Czechs say.  Also largely peaceful, the split of Czechoslovakia was later called the “Velvet Divorce.”  Written on the twentieth anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, this poem depicts the attitude I often feel venturing out into the moist November air on the 17th of the month in Slovakia. It will appear in an upcoming book of mine to be published by Scars Press, Chicago.

This is the day of the bloodless

This is the day of
the bloodless
revolution that didn’t
happen
among the Slavs of
Yugoslavia

This is the day that
brought forth the philosopher
king of Plato’s dreams

And somehow,
this November
became glorious, the
kind of day where
you can see the light
is what
became of the 17th
A day of revolution,
of fire, one that does
not burn, but refuses
only slightly threateningly
to cooperate
Either a day to see
the light or a
day to practice
forgetting, and somehow
when I stepped out, I
knew it was a day to
see the light.

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com.  He is from Chicago and spends most of his time travelling Europe and writing.  You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com.  If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email.  You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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When Ignoring The U.S. Embassy’s Advice Is A Good Policy

Travel Tips

November 15, 2017

Allan Stevo

The U.S. Department of State regularly advises travelers to register with the local U.S. Embassy when traveling. When I do this I am usually rewarded with important information. Though the information is meant to warn me of places I should not venture, I often take a different tack.

The U.S. Embassy in Bratislava performs an important service for me. It tells me what the really good events to go to are. From time to time public demonstrations take place in Slovakia. From time to time those public demonstrations are expected to be so interesting that they are noticed by the U.S. Embassy and the U.S. Embassy warn U.S. citizens residing in Bratislava to steer clear. One should do quite the opposite, especially in a country as peaceful as Slovakia.

These demonstrations are sometimes 1. Big 2. Loud or 3. Organized by extremist elements in Slovak society. Those are all reasons to attend. More often than not these events fizzle and are poorly attended.  No matter how big or small they are, they are always an opportunity to break the ice and to hear what makes a person tick.

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Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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Western Europe Has Long Been Friendly To Socialism, America Has Long Been UN-Friendly To Socialism And Should Remain So

Socialism

November 15, 2017

Allan Stevo

It can be hard to talk to many Western Europeans about politics. They have such comfort with socialism. Some – a solid portion of the people of Vienna would be one such example – almost seem to lament that their land was unable to spend the 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s of the last century on the same side of the Iron Curtain as the Slovaks, Czechs, Hungarians, East Germans, and the many other cultures trapped under that oppressive rule. It’s a terrible chapter in history that some portion of Western Europeans don’t adequately recognize the horrors of. Therefore, those same people enjoy flirting with the fringes of such inhumane and anti-human ideas.

That period behind the Iron Curtain was a rough time to be an advocate for freedom and a rough time to be alive if you wanted to be more than a sheep in the midst of the herd. “The grass that never grew tall didn’t get mowed down,” has been said to me time and again in different variations by Slovaks and others who lived under totalitarian rule. Individual excellence was frowned upon because individual excellence made you a target. Go to work, be mediocre, help out an authority figure when asked, go home to live your life quietly and privately, follow the rules and everything would be okay. Do not stand out. No matter how good of a reason you thought you had for standing out, from the thinking of many at the time who lived under totalitarian rule – it was always sure to be bad to stand out. Conformity was key.

The communist governments of Central and Eastern Europe excelled at this undermining of the individual. The socialist governments of Western Europe are not as effective at this, but are still effective at undermining the will of the individual.

Much writing has been done on how modern society so encapsulates the individual, rendering the individual effete and individual decisions so inconsequential that life has so little feeling and even less meaning. I turn to the existentialist movement, the writers of which have written tomes about this topic, or to many non-existentialists who wrote on the topic of human achievement as W.H. Auden did in his poem “The Unknown Citizen” or Hemingway in his grimly titled “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” or many others who saw the comfort and conformity of modernity as stifling to individual pursuits and restrictive to human development.

It is, after all, the outliers who achieve as outliers and eventually the mass of humanity comes along to follow them. It is not the mass of humanity that leads the way. No achievement happens from the guy sitting on his couch watching TV and drinking a six pack.

The guy on his couch, however, is part of the hard-to-stop, hard-to-redirect inertia of the status quo. His very existence, from the perspective of those seeking change, is to lend inertia. Inertia is okay. I don’t fault Joe six pack for that role. I do fault the philosopher, economist, or politician who advocate for a system that discourages individual potential and encourage more people to turn into Joe six packs.

It is additionally important to realize a consequence of so much comfort in the world – to make a stable, unchanging society even easier to achieve. If you could lock society into this precise moment in history and could make society as similar to now for as long as possible, is that the choice you would make? Probably not.

Some people mourn days bygone. Some people sit excited for the future. It’s hard to find someone who says “The world is absolutely perfect at this moment in time and should never change.” Yet, by supporting the socialist / democratic socialist / communist doctrines of contemporary Western Europe and seeking to advance them in America you do exactly that – you seek to solidify the present and to undermine change in mainstream American society. Additionally, you further isolate change agents on the fringes of society.

This is bad because it prevents the mainstream from being change agents. Also it prevents the mainstream from mingling with change agents. It further solidifies the status quo by removing change agents and pro-change-agent sentiments from the mainstream.

The impact of free market capitalism, to the contrary, offers incentives for every hobbyist to consider being an entrepreneur, every tinkerer to be a potential change agent. Change agents are not pushed artificially to the fringes of society in a free market – quite the contrary. When government steps aside, by stepping aside, government lowers the artificial governmental barriers to entry and that scenario makes it more advantageous for individuals to pursue their passions, perhaps some even doing so for profit. In a free market, human achievement is not artificially stifled in the name of leveling society and bringing egalitarianism.

There are things Western Europe is good at – working against development, solidifying the role of the aristocracy, sitting on their magnificent cultural laurels, giving bread (comfy pay checks), beer (awesome beer and wine), circuses (Eurovision and soccer), and leisure (35 hour work weeks) to their middle class to keep them content, and, of course, they are good at turning into an exploding powder keg of discontent every few generations then waging war on each other. It’s possible the war issue has finally been solved by the extensive bread and circuses, along with some cross cultural trade. Meanwhile, their aristocracy make their money overseas investing in places that are not so hardened by the layers of social plaque existent in Europe, a social plaque that stunts virtually all change or growth. America, “the new world,” is exactly that kind of place – where the European aristocracy invest and where society’s structure is not so calcified. They do business there and send their children there to learn the local ways. Other places in the world are similar – lacking in the burdensome social plaque of Western Europe – like parts of Central and Eastern Europe or parts of Asia – where individual achievement is praised, to an extent.

There are some in America who would love to mitigate exactly that. They propose the same failed policies that restrict individual achievement and promote the same type of social plaque that exists in Europe. Anyone who cherry picks the seemingly positive points of Europe to advocate for a greater level of government and ultimately to advocate for stepping toward socialism is guilty of exactly that – promoting the stifling social plaque that restrains Europe and pushes America toward that same stifling environment.

America plays a special role in the world. It is the experimental engine of growth. It is a place where entrepreneurship is uniquely promoted. It is a place where business is treated as the entity for social betterment that it is. There is great freedom to take risks. There is also great freedom to fail or succeed. It is a truly beautiful equation that needs no tweaking. It only needs to be left alone to work at its best.

Yes, in America we have a huge homeless population, and more billionaires live in America than anywhere else, and even more than that made their fortunes through American innovation. It is an engine of human achievement and growth. It is a land that generally allows for great success and great failure. That lack of social restriction and that lack of a social safety net, two items that are one in the same, has been a prominent distinction in American history. And the two sides of the coin, as far as human kind has proven, are necessary for that ultimate engine of human achievement. Some level of scarcity seems to be needed. Some level of risk seems to be needed.

That is how it has worked so far. Perhaps that scenario will change. Perhaps there will be other ways to allow for human achievement without leaving so many to fend for themselves. I am open to that. I respect new experiments from people endeavoring to live their own lives better and convincing others to voluntarily do the same. Despite all that hopefulness, it is obvious where that new model of social change won’t come from. It won’t come out of the tired and constantly proven wrong governmental methods of egalitarianism – see Plato, see Marx, see Lenin, see Mao, see Stalin, see the contemporary Western European counties, see the mainstream of American politics, see the frighteningly popular Bernie Sanders.

These examples all fit the tired and staid Europe. These examples, in which a portion of society that has earned enough to support themselves is being forced to pay for those who did not earn enough to support themselves, have repeatedly failed us as a society. They have failed humanity.

These broken, yet popular methods of social organization have limited human development through history. The examples are plentiful.

Some historians even go so far as to point to the bubonic plague as a scenario that could only happen under the oppressive, cruel governments of the time. The point out that human existence was so downtrodden and malnourished as a result of such high limitation on human freedom and development that it was possible for an illness to sweep through the downtrodden, unhealthy populace. It just happened to be that particular bacteria – Yersinia pestis – that swept through the population and the accompanying illness than decimated them, an illness and bacteria that continue to exist today and do not decimate populations. Because the populations of Europe were left so impoverished and weak by such terrible policies, any of a list of illnesses could have easily come through and been just as effective of a killer.

In recent memory, there were people in the West who could not get enough calories to survive. We are beyond that time. An over-abundance of calories has become a far greater threat to survival. Over generations, through technology and trade, we have banished hunger in a portion of the world. The calories may not be the most healthful calories, but 2,000-3,000 calories daily is possible for every adult who wants to put in the effort to seek those calories out. For $5 a day you can even obtain those calories somewhat nutritiously from a fast food establishment like McDonald’s. This is not ideal from my perspective, but this is a vast improvement on the post World War II poverty that was rampant across Europe. Could any swollen bellied child of the time imagine that one day, with twenty or thirty minutes of work, anyone would be able to buy a warm, delicious sandwich that was made from high grade beef, soft bread, and fresh vegetables?

I strongly dislike McDonald’s. I haven’t eaten a Big Mac or breakfast sandwich in perhaps ten years now. That doesn’t change the fact that McDonald’s is the preference of many people around the world. McDonald’s provides a relatively stable high quality experience across countries, cultures, supply chains, and currencies. Many people deservedly got rich building McDonald’s into the organization that it is. It drives down local prices and drives up local levels of quality. It even provides a fairly decent entry level job. The people who made that happen deserve to be rich.

It’s perhaps also worth noting that those who excelled in society and made a killing for themselves also brought great advancement in the quality of living to the rest of us schlubs who have never been part of the ultra wealthy.

Has Bill Gates improved your life or made it worse? You and the vast majority of computer users in the world have freely chosen to run his software. Your life is made easier by Microsoft at home and outside of the home in the vast array of companies that use Microsoft products to make your life easier and better. John Rockefeller made himself rich while making easy-to-access in-home energy, once an impossibility for the middle class, readily available to the middle class and ultimately even available to some of the poorest people in the United States. Steve Jobs made himself a billionaire by helping push forward some of the most life changing innovations of the last century – a user friendly well designed super computer in the pocket of every man woman and child, and a third party App Store that encourages amazing innovations for that tool. Henry Ford became rich innovating the car manufacturing process so well that some of the poorest Americans can have one, and put in place innovations that made it possible for even a relative child to drive a car.

The rich in America tend to make the world a better place through their business dealings. And sure it may feel unfair that someone like Warren Buffet, who is little more than a smart financier, a smart mergers and acquisitions guy, and a smart investor, has made himself and others so rich. On the surface, it appears like he hasn’t added a lot of value to society, because he hasn’t made anything or revolutionized any way of life. If I had to err on one side societally, I would much rather have the freedom for some people who don’t seem to add much value to get rich than to see even the slightest human advancements held back.

The more government will step out of the way of those seeking to bring advancement, the better off we are as a society. And it doesn’t just stop at the American borders – the better off we are as a human race.

This is a beautiful aspect that only America offers the world at this level and in this stage of history. One day I think a better world will have more room for that beautiful aspect that America offers, and hopefully many other societies will also offer the world.

There are those who act to restrain that development. Some don’t realize what they are doing – limiting human advancement. Some do realize what they are doing – their is a strange poverty mindset inherent in many such philosophies. Some eastern religious beliefs that developed under great poverty are such examples – to the extent that they appear practically pessimistic. They are hard to reconcile in the world of plenty that we have today. Stuck in that moralistic poverty mindset, such beliefs have a hard time providing pertinent messages for us in our time. Even the poorest Americans see much higher quality of life and enjoy higher life expectancy than people throughout much of human history. That development for some of the poorest is only improving as government steps out of the way and allows innovation to take place unchecked.

I so keenly favor this process that I have a hard time justifying government at all these days. When someone praises social security or the idea of universal basic income, I know I am speaking to someone who doesn’t understand markets, doesn’t understand US history and doesn’t see this vital part of what makes America so special in the world.

America is a unique place for its personal freedom and for its economic freedom. They are one in the same. The more I travel the world, write about the world, do business in the world, the more I recognize that to be true. And when I recognize it, the more aggressively opposed I become to anyone who seeks to deny the world that amazing font of humanity and human potential.

How much worse it is when they use a bad and thoroughly disproven Western European “democratic socialist” model as the format for doing that. At least be creative. At least step beyond Plato’s benevolent dictator or Marx’s own brand of that tired system of communism. At least recognize that you aren’t right just because you invented an idea. At least recognize when your own brilliant ideas is really just a regurgitation of another’s broken idea. At least read critically enough to know when your “brilliant” idea is just that and only that and to know how poorly it has worked for many eras of human existence, in many iterations, in many cultures, and in many situations. This is no coincidence. Your anti-human idea, your anti-individual idea is no better than all those other slightly tweaked failures. The world deserves that self-criticism from you before you seek to promote those anti-human ideas.

Do better than that if you seek to undermine the wellspring of human achievement in hopes of providing better for those who do not provide well enough for their own wants and therefore find themselves turning to others to care for them. You at least owe the world that much. But that we do not often get. Because reading is hard, especially reading with the level of humility it takes to be well-read. Meanwhile being convinced that your own harebrained idea on how to improve socialism is unique is very easy and therefore common.

Do better. You owe it to the world. Before you give even the slightest suggestion that you desire to destroy a system that has brought so much human happiness and development, you owe that much to the world.

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

Photo credit: Rebane’s Ruminations

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Has America Lost Her Way? The 22nd Anniversary Of The Velvet Revolution

Velvet Revolution

November 14, 2017

Allan Stevo

Twenty-two years ago Czechs and Slovaks shook off the chains of a regime and a system that had failed them.  Today America seems to be “trying on” similar, oppressive chains.  The deeper America gets into this process of trying those chains on, the more unfamiliar she looks to me.

Maybe some readers will be angry with me for saying so, but I would be remiss if I did not say these things that 1. I so clearly see and 2. that many others must either not recognize or not consider important enough to discuss.  This is when “if you see something, say something” must most importantly be applied.

Slovak schools and many businesses close on November 17 in commemoration of the Velvet Revolution.  It’s  probably the Slovak holiday that fascinates me the most and something I wrote about at length a year ago.  November 17, 1989, when you look at it, wasn’t all that special as an isolated day, but some historians point to it as the day that Czechoslovakia began its rebellion against its communist government.

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Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

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The Paralysis Of Perfection

Always Be Shipping

November 13, 2017

Allan Stevo

One of my favorite modern thinkers said to me the other day “We must not be paralyzed by the pursuit of a perfect plan.” This was not in regards to grandiose big government ideas, but rather in regards to relatively small tasks in life.

Life can be conquered in increments. “Step by step” is a popular way to remind oneself of how important it is to be patient and to go through big tasks, one patient step at a time or “Krok za krokom,” to use a Slovak-ism of the same phrase. “Rome wasn’t built in a day” – the great city on seven hills, the great civilization that formed there was not built in a day, but over many years.

We often overestimate how much we can accomplish in a day, we often underestimate how much we can accomplish in a year. Many people therefore structure their days with too much energy geared toward the short term and their year becomes an accumulation of exactly that – lots of short term activities, somewhat more disconnected than they need be, somewhat more disconnected than how a long term view would serve that individual. A very successful year can be broken into 300 or so mission critical tasks followed through on daily.. Many small projects, projects finished daily, add up to big results when properly stacked one after another.

A few weeks ago, speaking to a successful software engineer who has come to lead a sizeable team of engineers, I was told “I like to ship every few hours if possible, and every few days at the least.” That means he and his team are constantly finishing up small tasks and releasing them. Small tasks in software can be rough to release because they might not fit with the rest of the software as well as a gigantic global solution to software the way that a total updated version or a version built from the ground up might. His attitude though is to constantly be releasing something. That attitude is an important one. “Always be closing,” said Alec Baldwin’s character in “Glengarry, Glen Ross.” This is a useful dictum in the business world, but is also a useful concept in life – what are you work on finishing right now?

Ernest Hemingway shares a similar perspective when he wrote about fellow writer F. Scott Fitzgerald and the craft of writing: “Scott took LITERATURE so solemnly. He never understood that it was just writing as well as you can and finishing what you start.” Being an eager starter is one half of ambition. It is only one half though. Being an eager finisher is the other half. Hemingway boils writing down to doing your best and simply finishing what you start. How vital that second part is, otherwise life for the inspired ends up filled with “piles” of thousands of unfinished essays and projects, rather than a step by step smooth transition from one mission critical task to the next. A life in which one mission critical daily task leads so seamless both in hindsight and in foresight to a large and impressive goal. These piles are signs of failed accomplishments, but for some they are also a type of baggage, littering life with their incompleteness and limiting the ease with which the next project can be started and finished.

A series of dictums that has become popular in the contemporary creative culture – “The Cult of Done Manifesto” – conveys a similar concept to Hemingway: get it done and out, if getting it perfect is your goal then keep coming back later to revise, but make it happen and make it happen now. It even goes so far as to say anything requiring more than a week of time is not worth your attention. “Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.”

Of course it doesn’t mean that anything that takes more than a week is not worth your attention – careers, children, life – but it is accurate in that it references projects that draw on endlessly as an issue of scope that are best chunked down into smaller pieces that last no more than a week. With a little practice, life can somewhat easily be broken down into mission critical tasks that offer a sense of both a new start and completion in a week or less.

Every week, one can take a task and see to it that it is done. Even better one can take one single mission critical task for the day points out Tim Ferriss and work on that one single task with lightning focus and to be sure that task gets done. You can do many things that day if you wish, but accomplishing that one critical task is paramount for the day. Get it done and your day is a success, don’t get that mission critical task done and your day is a failure. Something must be the most important thing on your to do list and have the highest priority.

Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld uttered the most excellent words I’ve ever heard come out of his mouth when he pointed out a few years ago in New York City “If you have seventeen priorities, you don’t have any priorities.” What is the one thing you care about accomplishing today more than any other? Can you do that single thing today and go to bed feeling accomplished just because it got done? What is that one thing you must get done this week? Can you do that one thing this week and reach a restful spot in the weekend breathing a little more deeply because it is done? Can you do those things, even more significantly, as a step in the direction of larger life goals?

Once that small chunk is done, accomplished, you have all the more momentum to move on to the next small chunk right away or the next day. Great goals suddenly don’t look like long fatigued slogs across a barren wasteland in pursuit of a distant goal. Those great goals look instead like all of life’s other great journeys – perhaps through places like Seoul or New York or Bogota or travels around the world where in your travels, you are given a treasure every time you step outside. Every day can be a journey. Just like in traveling, the end of the day can be reflected on from the comfort of a soft pillow and seen to have a beginning (not knowing), a middle (action), and an end (completion). And the more comfortable you get with that process of traveling in life and treating your life as daily, adventurous travels toward an intentional, distant destination, the more comfortable you get in starting and most importantly – completing. Every day.

A college professor of mine talked about a friend who spent ten years on a book that everyone in his life knew he was working on and no one ever saw. For ten years he worked constantly on it. It was his first book and he aimed to make it a masterpiece, to unveil nothing but an absolute piece of perfection. At the end of ten long years, his finished product was unveiled and it was horrible. Even he ultimately felt so. He didn’t chunk his time right, he spent ten years in the joy of the activity rather than getting what he wanted done. Spending time in the joy of an activity is also a worthy task, such a hobbyist view of an activity just shouldn’t be confused with getting something done. It is instead leisure time, akin to channel surfing for hours rather than watching a complete film, or clicking every link you see on Wikipedia for an entire day and reading a little rather than finishing any one article or better yet, a thoroughly researched book on a single topic written by a capable thinker with his name and reputation attached to the work.

I am all for long pursuits in life. I am not for long pursuits that are not properly chunked down into small pieces that allow the participants to feel weekly, and ideally, daily victories. You have some beautiful long pursuits I imagine. Within those pursuits, I wonder how you can chunk it down, so that today you feel a great sense of accomplishment, perhaps even a few hours from now, a sense of accomplishment toward a goal, perhaps a vital goal to you, one of your most important dreams, that at the moment feels months or years away. What can you ship this week? What can you ship today? What will you ship today?

I shipped this piece of writing.

And now it’s time to move on to the next mission critical task.

Allan Stevo writes on Slovak culture at www.52inSk.com. He is from Chicago and spends most of his time traveling Europe and writing. You can find more of his writing at www.AllanStevo.com. If you enjoyed this post, please use the buttons below to like it on Facebook or to share it with your friends by email. You can sign up for emails on Slovak culture from 52 Weeks in Slovakia by clicking here.

Photo credit: Home Care Assistance, Linfield College, Go Abroad

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